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Multi Tier Raised Planters

I have written a blog about elevations in landscape design. This blog will be narrower in scope. This blog will be on raised planters.

What started me thinking about doing a blog on raised planters is that I have a client that wanted multi tier raised planters so that she would be able to sit on the wall and garden and then have another that she would be able to access the raised planters.  Since we are working with some existing masonry, a couple of seat walls and a fireplace the raised planters were to be at different heights.

I have been to a few homes where because a necessity the builder terraced parts of the yard with raised planters. I have been in yards where each terrace is about three feet high and three feet deep totaling to as many as five terraces in the yard.

So now to get back to the raised planters, since I already have different heights working off the seat walls and fire place, how about terracing the deeper raised planters. I have the raised planters at eight inches, sixteen inches and twenty four inches. The eight inch high raised planters will not be very deep. The plan will be for her to sit on the sixteen inch tall raised planters and manage both the eight inch and sixteen inch high raised planters. To garden the twenty inch high seat raised planters, we will have flagstone stepping stones placed in the sixteen inch high raised planter and twenty-four inch high raised planter. The stepping stone will have wooly thyme growing in between them.

I am very excited about using varying height raised planters. This will add a great deal of interest to the yard. The flagstone cap will be a nice finish and the flagstone stepping stones placed within the raised planters will a safety and connivance feature.

The inside of the raised planters will be sealed. We are still debating about whether or not to use CMU block or a “Weston Wall” type product. The reason I bring this up is that if we go the Weston Wall direction we will also use plastic to contain the soil. If not we can tar the raised planters.

Although I like the Weston Wall type products, the existing seat wall, BBQ and fireplace all have engineered stone and I do not want to compete with them. This is why I am leaning more the CMU block with a stucco finish. Maybe I will do a flagstone cap with the same cultured stone here and there to bring it all together.

I need to think about cost as well. Using the CMU for the raised planters as I mentioned in the previously, she will be able to add the engineered stone at a later date.

Keep in mind none of these raised planters are built yet. I am past the conceptual stage but I am still perusing my options. I keep going back and forth with the eight inch high wall. Although with the flagstone cap it will be closer in height to ten inches high. I may change it to a twelve inch high wall. It probably sounds like I am over thinking this for two inches, but I always tell my clients that it is easier to move things on paper. So what I will most likely do is a quick 3d drawing in SketchUP. This will give both the client and myself views of the raised planters from every imaginable perspective. I can even do a fly through which is a view of the project as if you were waking in it. Being able to give a client options like this takes away any doubt that someone has on how the project lays out in real life.

Keep in mind when you are designing a multi tier raised planters project. These raised planters tiers will not be visual I’m a 2D format. This is where 3D becomes a big plus. It is always important to me that the client understands how the plan is to look and although 3D is more time consuming it is still easier to move things on paper.

I have written a blog about elevations in landscape design. This blog will be narrower in scope. This blog will be on raised planters.

What started me thinking about doing a blog on raised planters is that I have a client that wanted multi tier raised planters so that she would be able to sit on the wall and garden and then have another that she would be able to access the raised planters.  Since we are working with some existing masonry, a couple of seat walls and a fireplace the raised planters were to be at different heights.

I have been to a few homes where because a necessity the builder terraced parts of the yard with raised planters. I have been in yards where each terrace is about three feet high and three feet deep totaling to as many as five terraces in the yard.

So now to get back to the raised planters, since I already have different heights working off the seat walls and fire place, how about terracing the deeper raised planters. I have the raised planters at eight inches, sixteen inches and twenty four inches. The eight inch high raised planters will not be very deep. The plan will be for her to sit on the sixteen inch tall raised planters and manage both the eight inch and sixteen inch high raised planters. To garden the twenty inch high seat raised planters, we will have flagstone stepping stones placed in the sixteen inch high raised planter and twenty-four inch high raised planter. The stepping stone will have wooly thyme growing in between them.

I am very excited about using varying height raised planters. This will add a great deal of interest to the yard. The flagstone cap will be a nice finish and the flagstone stepping stones placed within the raised planters will a safety and connivance feature.

The inside of the raised planters will be sealed. We are still debating about whether or not to use CMU block or a “Weston Wall” type product. The reason I bring this up is that if we go the Weston Wall direction we will also use plastic to contain the soil. If not we can tar the raised planters.

Although I like the Weston Wall type products, the existing seat wall, BBQ and fireplace all have engineered stone and I do not want to compete with them. This is why I am leaning more the CMU block with a stucco finish. Maybe I will do a flagstone cap with the same cultured stone here and there to bring it all together.

I need to think about cost as well. Using the CMU for the raised planters as I mentioned in the previously, she will be able to add the engineered stone at a later date.

Keep in mind none of these raised planters are built yet. I am past the conceptual stage but I am still perusing my options. I keep going back and forth with the eight inch high wall. Although with the flagstone cap it will be closer in height to ten inches high. I may change it to a twelve inch high wall. It probably sounds like I am over thinking this for two inches, but I always tell my clients that it is easier to move things on paper. So what I will most likely do is a quick 3d drawing in SketchUP. This will give both the client and myself views of the raised planters from every imaginable perspective. I can even do a fly through which is a view of the project as if you were waking in it. Being able to give a client options like this takes away any doubt that someone has on how the project lays out in real life.

Keep in mind when you are designing a multi tier raised planters project. These raised planters tiers will not be visual I’m a 2D format. This is where 3D becomes a big plus. It is always important to me that the client understands how the plan is to look and although 3D is more time consuming it is still easier to move things on paper.

 

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